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    CVS pharmacy

    If you’re a typical worker at CVS Health, the CEO of your company makes about 434 times what you do.

    That disparity recently landed CVS the number-one spot on a list of companies whose workers deserve a raise. Analysts at the website 24/7 Wall St. examined data for 168 companies and 50 made the list.

    Exactly how much more money did CVS CEO Larry J. Merlo make than the average CVS employee? Merlo took home $12,105,481 in cash, while the annual pay of an average worker at the pharmacy chain was $27,900. That doesn’t include Merlo’s stock options and bonuses, which upped his total compensation to $22,855,374. (The figures are from 2016). This map shows the average salary in every state.

    By comparison, HCA Holdings ranked fiftieth on the list. The health care services company’s CEO, R. Milton Johnson, took home $5,604,403 in cash in 2016, with a total compensation of $13,970,215. The median worker’s salary at the company, which owns hospitals and surgery centers around the United States, was $56,100, making the ratio between CEO and employee wages 100 to 1.

    The gap between CEOs and average workers has widened significantly over the past few decades. From 1978 to 2017, payouts to CEOs at the 350 largest companies in the United States increased by more than 1,000 percent, according to 24/7 Wall St.’s calculations. Meanwhile, the salaries of the average employees have remained relatively flat over the same time frame, going up by only about 11.2 percent. Here’s how much the average person earns in their lifetime.

    What do those percentages look like in take-home pay? The average CEO at a Fortune 500 company earns a base salary of more than $10 million. Stock options and bonuses nearly double that income. By contrast, the average full-time worker in the United States makes about $45,550 every year. Find out the things HR won’t tell you about salaries and raises.

    Merlo, a former pharmacist, took over as CEO and president of Rhode Island-based CVS Health in 2011. The company has more than 9,800 pharmacies, 1,100 walk-in clinics, and provides drug benefits to more than 94 million people, according to its website. In 2017, the company took in $184.8 billion in net revenues. Last week, the U.S. Justice Department approved CVS Health’s $69 billion bid to buy insurance giant Aetna.

    Here are the other companies that made the top ten:

    1. CBS: CEO to worker wage ratio (cash): 395 to 1. (CEO Leslie Moonves resigned in September.)
    2. Walt Disney: 367 to 1.
    3. TJX Companies: 327 to 1.
    4. Twenty-First Century Fox: 311 to 1.
    5. Comcast: 301 to 1.
    6. L Brands: 285 to 1.
    7. Honeywell International: 279 to 1.
    8. Pepsico: 259 to 1 (CEO Indra K. Nooyi resigned earlier this month)
    9. Wynn Resorts: 238 to 1.

    Next, find out the highest-paying job in every state.

    The post The Startling Reason CVS Employees Need a Raise appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    The Startling Reason CVS Employees Need a Raise

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    You won't believe how much more the company's CEO makes than its employees.

    The post The Startling Reason CVS Employees Need a Raise appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 21:25:17 +0000

    If your mucus is gray or black…

    Focus on caucasian young woman hand putting out cigarette on glass ashtray on wooden table, cigarette butt, smoking is dying. Quit smoking. Health concept. Close up photo

    …you likely inhaled dark-colored particles, like smoke from a fire or heavy exhaust. Regular smokers can also blow out darker mucus because of the tar or other toxic byproducts they inhale, says Alfred M.C. Iloreta, Jr., MD, an otolaryngologist at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. If you’re not a smoker, black mucus could mean a serious fungal infection, especially in people with compromised immune systems, according to Cleveland Clinic. Wondering why we even have mucus in the first place? Here’s the explanation (plus, the science behind 9 other types of body gunk).

    The post 8 Things Your Mucus Says About Your Health appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    8 Things Your Mucus Says About Your Health

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    The color and texture of your mucus can give clues about your overall health.

    The post 8 Things Your Mucus Says About Your Health appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 21:00:00 +0000

    Don’t speed—or at least keep it to a minimum

    17 Secrets Traffic Cops Aren't Telling You About Avoiding a Speeding TicketYou can keep yourself and your loved ones safe—not to mention the people you’re sharing the road with—by simply observing the speed limit. Slowing down makes a lot of sense—speeding is the number two cause of motor vehicle accidents. (Distracted driving is number one, drunk driving comes in third.)

    That said, as a general matter you can probably drive a few miles per hour above the speed limit without attracting the attention of police officers, according to every police officer we spoke to—including retired Police Captain Michael Palardy (Millburn, NJ). If the only thing you’re doing wrong is driving a few miles per hour over the speed limit, says Harold Hilliard, retired Plano, Texas police officer, you’ll probably be fine.

    However, if you do get pulled over, all it takes is going one mile per hour faster than the posted speed limit to get a ticket, says insurance advisor, Bradley Hamburger. And if you try to fight it in traffic court, it’ll be up to you to prove that you weren’t going even a single mile per hour over the speed limit.

    The post 17 Secrets Traffic Cops Aren’t Telling You About Avoiding a Speeding Ticket appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    17 Secrets Traffic Cops Aren’t Telling You About Avoiding a Speeding Ticket

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    We're not saying you should speed. But we do know a few tricks to keep you under the "radar," so to speak.

    The post 17 Secrets Traffic Cops Aren’t Telling You About Avoiding a Speeding Ticket appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 20:15:52 +0000

    Do you really have to be wary on Thanksgiving?

    Overhead view of Homemade Thanksgiving Turkey with all sides vegetables fruits on festive white backgroundThanksgiving is one of the days people feel it’s OK to unbuckle their belts and be indulgent. The holiday meal is full of delicious dishes and hey, it’s only once a year. However, eating all that food over a few hours can lead to bloating and even weight gain. “Holidays are tricky because there is temptation everywhere,” says Chanel Kenner, a nutritionist. Find out what foods nutritionists would never eat on turkey day.

    The post 14 Foods Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    14 Foods Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving

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    We asked nutrition pros about the dishes and desserts they won't let pass their lips during this year's holiday feast.

    The post 14 Foods Nutritionists Would Never Eat on Thanksgiving appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 20:04:44 +0000

    Mad as a hatter

    Men hatsThe Mad Hatter is one of the most beloved characters from Lewis Carroll’s classic children’s book, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. While fans love him for his hilarious eccentricity, the idea of a hatter being insane is actually based in history. Hat-makers in the 18th and 19th centuries often suffered mental deterioration because of mercury poisoning. Follow these 41 grammar rules to sound smarter.

    The post 16 Everyday Phrases with Surprisingly Dark Origins appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    16 Everyday Phrases with Surprisingly Dark Origins

    https://www.rd.com/?post_type=listicle&p=750727
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    They say the devil is in the details...

    The post 16 Everyday Phrases with Surprisingly Dark Origins appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 19:42:47 +0000

    Vampires

    Halloween design background with , naked trees, and bats and moon

    Long before Edward Cullen and the Twilight vampires, Slavic folklore came up with the idea of the dead drinking the blood of the living in order to explain contagious diseases. If someone in a village died and then someone else became sick, it was blamed on the deceased coming back to harm them. Grisly rituals were then performed on the body to stop them preying on the living, desecrations that were later also done in western Europe and even in America to quell supposed vampirism. But Irish author Bram Stoker and his popular 1897 novel Dracula, inspired by this folklore and allegedly the brutal medieval ruler Vlad the Impaler, brought vampires into the mainstream. Countless Dracula movie adaptations and new blood-sucking characters keep the creatures in our modern midst. Check out these vampire legends that are actually true.

    The post The Hidden Origins of Halloween’s Spookiest Creatures appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    The Hidden Origins of Halloween’s Spookiest Creatures

    https://www.rd.com/?post_type=listicle&p=750796
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    Find out the secret stories of these supernatural beings, from ancient myths to modern incarnations.

    The post The Hidden Origins of Halloween’s Spookiest Creatures appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 19:30:07 +0000

    Pay attention to your cat

    Happy kitten likes being stroked by woman's hand. The British ShorthairYou should make a point of interacting with your cat, says Kristyn Vitale, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in the Human-Animal Interaction Lab at Oregon State University: “Research indicates that cats will more frequently approach and play with a person who is attentive to them compared to a person who is ignoring them.” Check out these 17 things you never knew about your cat.

    The post 13 Ways to Get Your Cat to Like You appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    13 Ways to Get Your Cat to Like You

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    Pay attention to your cat You should make a point of interacting with your cat, says Kristyn Vitale, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in the Human-Animal...

    The post 13 Ways to Get Your Cat to Like You appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 18:15:41 +0000

    Millions More People Can Now Benefits from This Anti-Cancer Vaccine

    In 2006, science gained a distinct advantage over the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus known to cause cancer and other diseases in both men and women: That’s when the FDA first approved the anti-HPV vaccine Gardasil. In the decade that followed, even greater strides were made in the form of Gardasil 9, which is effective against nine different HPV strains. Until now, Gardasil 9 had been available only for people between the ages of 9 and 26, but in an exciting new development, the FDA has OK’d Gardasil 9 for adults between the ages of 27 and 45. Check out 10 dangerous myths about HPV.

    HPV is a widespread public health issue—about 14 million Americans becoming infected each year. Of those, roughly 12,000 women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,000 will die. Men not only can pass the virus but also face the risk of anal and esophageal cancer, among other types of cancer. Experts estimate that over a recent two-year period, nearly 23 percent of Americans between the ages of 18 to 59 had some form of HPV. Find out 9 facts about cervical cancer.

    Originally, the FDA limited Gardasil 9 to people between the ages of 9 and 26 because research suggested that the vaccine was most effective for that age group, in which HPV infection was less likely. But medical professionals had begun to suspect that Gardasil might benefit people older than 26. Then, in a groundbreaking study that followed 3,200 women between the ages of 27 and 46 for an average of 3.5 years, Gardasil was found to be 88 percent effective in preventing the infection. Ignore these 10 myths about vaccines.

    Follow-up research confirmed the results—and revealed that men could benefit too. “Today’s approval represents an important opportunity to help prevent HPV-related diseases and cancers in a broader age range,” said Peter Marks, MD, PhD, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated that HPV vaccination prior to becoming infected . . . has the potential to prevent more than 90 percent of these cancers, or 31,200 cases every year, from ever developing.” Although the vaccine does not protect you from an HPV strain if you are already infected with it, it will still protect against other strains.  If you’re worried about getting a vaccine, check out 40 facts about vaccines that these medical professionals wish you knew.

    The post Millions More People Can Now Benefit from This Anticancer Vaccine appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Millions More People Can Now Benefit from This Anticancer Vaccine

    https://www.rd.com/?p=750644
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    In 2006, science gained a distinct advantage over the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus known to cause cancer and other diseases in both males and females: That's when the FDA first approved the anti-HPV vaccine Gardasil.

    The post Millions More People Can Now Benefit from This Anticancer Vaccine appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 17:28:28 +0000

    a jug of milk on wooden table / Photo: Shutterstock / images72

    There’s a new secret ingredient in town: buttermilk. And you’d better stock up for the holidays. In cornbread, buttermilk tenderizes and adds depth of flavor. Toss that cornbread in a stuffing, and you might be stuck making it. Every. Single. Year. (You could always leave some out for the Jolly Old Elf, too.)

    Why buttermilk?

    Why is it so incredible? Here’s the breakdown: Buttermilk’s acidic properties (ahem) break down long strands of gluten and other proteins in baked goods, so when you want something to be tender, buttermilk’s your answer.

    Taste of Home Food Editor Rashanda Cobbins is all about this tart ingredient from the dairy case. “I tend to use regular (liquid) buttermilk, and I buy it in amounts as small as 16 ounces.” That’s just a pint, folks. Two cups. If you can’t find a use for two cups of buttermilk, head on over to this cinnamon-y quick bread or these divine muffins, or try out these fluffy buttermilk waffles.

    “If you have buttermilk left over,” Rashanda adds, “experiment with it in cooking. It adds more flavor and complexity to a dish.” That’s right, play with it!

    Swap it in for either water or regular milk, keeping in mind that it adds a yogurt-like tang to foods. And when you’ve used most of that carton already? Pour 1/2 cup into this homemade ranch dressing, or use some in an ultra tenderizing marinade for fried chicken. Of course, it’s unbeatable for biscuits, and you can whisk it into a custard for holiday-fancy French toast, too. Check out another surprising secret ingredient that will produce the fluffiest pancakes ever.

    Here’s how you can really stock up

    If you still aren’t sold on keeping a carton of buttermilk on hand at all times, check out the powdered version. Rashanda says there’ll be no real difference in the finished product.

    I’m a mom who shops mostly at warehouse stores, so there are weeks I don’t make it to a traditional grocery store at all. Because picking up a pint or quart of buttermilk isn’t always in the cards, I keep a container of the powdered buttermilk in my fridge—at all times. (The powder should last a long, long while and is perfect for a pancake emergency.) For most baking, you can use the conversion table on the powder package to determine how much to mix in with the dry ingredients, then use water in lieu of buttermilk with the wet ingredients. I may not be a buttermilk connoisseur, but I have never had a bad result. Even gluten-free recipes can benefit from the addition of buttermilk powder. Psst: You can also use the powder in this eggnog mix (it lasts six months, so you can work ahead!).

    As Rashanda says, “There are more benefits nutritionally than people realize (more calcium than milk, plus other vitamins and minerals), and it also provides an unexpected ‘can’t-put-my-finger-on-it’ flavor in whatever dishes you use it in. It’s also an ingredient that our grandmothers used in the past and it’s sort of forgotten now.” Well, we won’t forget you, buttermilk. Read on for 25 more brilliant kitchen shortcuts you’ll wish you knew sooner.

    The post Here’s Why Buttermilk Should Be Your Secret Holiday Ingredient appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Here’s Why Buttermilk Should Be Your Secret Holiday Ingredient

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    There's a new secret ingredient in town!

    The post Here’s Why Buttermilk Should Be Your Secret Holiday Ingredient appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 17:17:36 +0000

    There are a few popular Thanksgiving misconceptions

    Thanksgiving with fruit and vegetable on wood in autumn and Fall harvest cornucopia seasonIt’s one of American history’s most familiar scenes: A small group of Pilgrims prepares a huge November feast to give thanks for a bountiful harvest and show their appreciation to the Indians who helped them survive their first winter. Together, the Pilgrims and Indians solemnly sit down to a meal of turkey, pumpkin pie, and cranberries. But just how accurate is this image of America’s first Thanksgiving? Not very, it turns out. Here are some common misconceptions about the origin of one of our favorite holidays.

    The post 11 Thanksgiving “Facts” That Actually Aren’t True appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    11 Thanksgiving “Facts” That Actually Aren’t True

    https://www.rd.com/?post_type=listicle&p=750253
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    Most of the traditional Thanksgiving dinner is a lie.

    The post 11 Thanksgiving “Facts” That Actually Aren’t True appeared first on Reader's Digest.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 17:13:13 +0000