Home Main Google Yahoo Bing WC Aol Deja Duck AJ Lycos IX Yan Yac DP BH WM BB Baidu A YT GMap
  • Sign In   
  • N M C R
      


    You are not logged in. You can not add RSS Feeds untill logged in

    Apott.com RSS Feeds

    Logged in Members can add and delete some personal RSS feeds(Under Terms of Service). If they do not work- Mail Me and I will fix.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sand Dune Sunset” by Michael Swindle. Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado.
    Photo By Michael Swindle

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sand Dune Sunset” by Michael Swindle. Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado.

    See more of Michael Swindle’s photography at www.mikeswindlephotography.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Michael Swindle appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Michael Swindle

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=601502
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-michael-swindle-2/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sand Dune Sunset” by Michael Swindle. Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Sand Dune Sunset” by Michael Swindle. Location: Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado. See...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Michael Swindle appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Fri, 14 Dec 2018 15:53:25 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Infinite” by Max Foster. Location: Death Valley National Park, California.
    Photo By Max Foster

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Infinite” by Max Foster. Location: Death Valley National Park, California.

    A super-telephoto shot of sand dunes in Death Valley, just seconds after the sun rose above the nearby mountains,” describes Foster.

    See more of Max Foster’s photography at http://maxfosterphotography.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Max Foster appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Max Foster

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=601499
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-max-foster-3/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Infinite” by Max Foster. Location: Death Valley National Park, California.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Infinite” by Max Foster. Location: Death Valley National Park, California. “A super-telephoto shot of...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Max Foster appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Thu, 13 Dec 2018 15:50:19 +0000

    Mountain Spirits, San Juan Mountains, Colorado
    Photo By Brian VanDenzen

    Nearly every October, I journey into the San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado to bask in the warm days and crisp, cool nights of fall, and to find that quiet inner peace that a moment of high country autumn light and shimmering aspen gold can provide to the soul. While the San Juan Mountains offer some of the most famous fall vistas in all of photography, I now look more for lesser-known scenes than the iconic autumn locations that draw so many photographers to these mountains.

    On a cold, rainy Friday evening in mid-October, I drove up to Molas Pass near Silverton, Colorado, parked along a forest road, and slept in the back of my truck. As the rain continued all night heavily, I slept restlessly, wondering if the Saturday morning sunrise would materialize. Upon waking two hours before dawn, the area was enveloped in fog that I doubted would clear before first light.

    Nevertheless, not wanting to miss a peaceful morning in the autumn high country, I layered up and hiked a short distance to a vista of an old miner’s cabin I had scouted numerous times over the years. I knew that from a certain spot in the trees, an old two-track dirt road would make a nice leading line toward the abandoned cabin and the distant mountains. And I knew there was a stand of aspen sitting behind the cabin—a stand that I hoped would still show its golden, shimmering fall color this late in the season. The various compositional elements were all in place to make the autumn sunrise image I envisioned, if only the fog would lift enough to allow morning light to stream through the scene. I sat quietly in the cold, fog-shrouded woods as the time for sunrise came and went without the warmth of the sun. While disappointed in missing the golden sunrise light I had envisioned, I was warmed by the sound of a bugling of elk somewhere far below in the mountain valley.

    Finally, about 90 minutes after sunrise, the fog began to dance intermittently with beams of penetrating sunlight. I was fortunate to see a column of fog lift from the valley and above the golden aspen trees immediately behind the cabin, illuminated by a beam of sunlight from the east. As I was preparing to shoot, I thought that the deep contrasts of a black-and-white image would best capture the moment and the question I had contemplated most of that foggy morning: What was the spirit of the people who built and lived in that lonely, one-room cabin, hard on the side of a rocky mountain meadow?

    Perhaps, like the decaying cabin, their spirit was nothing more than a fleeting moment, lost with the lifting fog. Yet on that foggy, cold autumn morning, I believed from deep within that those mountains still remembered their spirit. OP

    See more of Brian VanDenzen’s work at desertdogphotography.com.

    Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM at 70mm, Singh-Ray 3-stop graduated neutral density filter, Lee circular polarizer, remote shutter release, Gitzo GT2542LS Series 2 tripod, Acratech GP ball head. Exposure: 1/60 sec., ƒ/8, ISO 160.

    The post Mountain Spirits appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Mountain Spirits

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=601530
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/mountain-spirits/

    Mountain Spirits, San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Nearly every October, I journey into the San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado to bask in the warm days and...

    The post Mountain Spirits appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Thu, 13 Dec 2018 00:50:07 +0000

    Photo By Menx Cuizon
    Photo By Menx Cuizon

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Make A Wish” by Menx Cuizon. Location: Thors Well, Cape Perpetua, Oregon.

    See more of Menx Cuizon’s photography at www.menxcuizonphotography.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Menx Cuizon appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Menx Cuizon

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=600878
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-menx-cuizon-5/

    Photo By Menx Cuizon

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Make A Wish” by Menx Cuizon. Location: Thors Well, Cape Perpetua, Oregon. See more...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Menx Cuizon appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Wed, 12 Dec 2018 15:48:26 +0000

    Outdoor Photographer Editors' Picks

    Each year, we select the top cameras, lenses and photographic accessories that we feel represent the advancements made in the art and technology of photography.

    While not a comprehensive collection of all of the noteworthy gear introduced in 2018, each of our Editors' Picks has some unique quality or capability that made it stand out for us as among the best of the best.

    Best New Full-Frame Mirrorless System: Nikon Z

    Nikon Z 7 shown with Mount Adapter FTZ and AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm F2.8G ED.

    2018 was a turning point for full-frame mirrorless systems, with both Canon and Nikon introducing new cameras and lens mounts after years of speculation and wondering when they would enter this market. Sony has had this segment all to itself since introducing the a7 and a7R in 2013, and in that time has seen its market share explode due to the popularity, performance and consistent development of that system. It was inevitable that Canon and Nikon would need to address the photographers who were leaving their systems for Sony’s mirrorless options.

    Both companies made a strong debut, and though there’s a lot to like about both the Canon EOS R and Nikon Z series cameras, Nikon takes the top spot for introducing not one but two new cameras: the Z 6 and Z 7. Identical in exterior design, the two models’ key differences are in resolution and continuous shooting speeds. The Nikon Z 7 offers 45.7 megapixel resolution and can shoot at up to 9 fps. The Z 6 is lower resolution at 24.5 megapixels but is faster at up to 12 fps. Compare that to the 30.3-megapixel EOS R, which tops out at 8 fps in One-Shot AF mode or 5 fps with Servo (continuous) AF.

    Canon put a lot of thought into the EOS R, adding convenient new features such as a Control Ring on its new RF mount lenses that allows customizable control over exposure settings, and while longtime Canon shooters with a collection of Canon glass will find this to be an excellent addition to their camera kits (see George Lepp’s review in this issue), we were impressed that Nikon introduced two models that emphasize different performance characteristics. We expect landscape photographers will appreciate the big resolution of the Z 7, while wildlife photographers have the option of even faster shooting rates with the Z 6. Both cameras also incorporate 5-stop, in-camera image stabilization systems—a feature that Canon curiously chose to omit from the EOS R. List prices (body only): $3,399 (Z 7); $1,999 (Z 6). Contact: Nikon, nikonusa.com.

    Check out the Nikon Z6 on B&H! | Check out the Nikon Z7 on B&H!

    Best New Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera: Sony a7 III

    Sony a7 III

    For its excellent value—the first a-Series to be priced under $2,000 at introduction—the Sony a7 III is our pick for the best new full-frame mirrorless camera. Though not quite up to the specs of its higher-tier siblings like the a7R III or the flagship a9, it’s incredibly capable with a 24.2-megapixel sensor, continuous shooting at up to 10 fps and a dynamic range of 14 stops, and currently placing in the top 10 cameras for overall image quality in DxOMark’s independent testing. For photographers who want to step up to full-frame mirrorless at the best value for price, the a7 III is the camera to beat. Contact: Sony, sony.com.

    Check out the Sony a7 III on B&H!

    Best New APS-C Sensor Mirrorless Camera: Fujifilm X-H1

    Fujifilm X-H1

    Though full-frame mirrorless development is heating up, there’s still a lot to like about smaller-sensor systems, such as their ability to provide greater telephoto magnification in smaller, lighter lenses. Fujifilm’s X-series cameras have enjoyed a dedicated fan base for their excellent image quality and compact camera bodies, and with the introduction of the X-H1 this year, Fujifilm offered a new level of performance for nature photographers. The 24.3 megapixel APS-C sensor camera is Fujifilm’s first to incorporate 5-axis in-body image stabilization and offers continuous shooting rates of up to 14 fps with its electronic shutter or 8 fps with its mechanical shutter, making it the fastest Fujifilm X-series camera by a wide margin. It also offers an upgraded AF system enhanced for low-light performance that’s compatible with apertures as small as ƒ/11. Though we’ve admired Fujifilm’s mirrorless cameras, the X-H1 is the first model that we feel is especially well-suited for the needs of the outdoor photographer. List price: $1,899. Contact: Fujifilm, fujifilmusa.com.

    Check out the Fujifilm X-H1 on B&H!

    Best New DSLR: Nikon D3500

    Nikon D3500

    With the emphasis on full-frame mirrorless development this year, it was a relatively quiet one for DSLR introduction. Just two DSLR models were released: the Canon EOS Rebel T7 and the Nikon D3500. Both are entry-level budget models and very similar in specs, with 24-megapixel resolution and comparable Full HD 1080p video capabilities. The Nikon D3500 edges the Canon out in speed, though, with 5 fps continuous shooting versus the EOS Rebel T7’s 3 fps. At $499 for the body only, it’s a great option for photographers stepping up from smartphones and compact cameras to an interchangeable-lens DSLR. Contact: Nikon, nikonusa.com.

    Check out the Nikon D3500 on B&H!

    Best New Compact Camera: Nikon Coolpix P1000

    Nikon P1000

    Compact cameras have been squeezed out in recent years with the proliferation of good-quality smartphone cameras for casual shooters and the affordability of interchangeable-lens cameras for photographers who want greater creative flexibility. But there are still noteworthy introductions in the compact, fixed-lens camera space. This year, the standout model is the Nikon Coolpix P1000, with its incredible 125x optical zoom, which provides a 35mm-equivalent focal range from 24mm to 3,000mm. That’s impressive for a camera that’s priced at just $999 and weighs approximately the same as a Nikon D5 body only. Contact: Nikon, nikonusa.com.

    Check out the Nikon P1000 on B&H!

    The post Editors’ Picks: Best Photo Gear 2018 appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Editors’ Picks: Best Photo Gear 2018

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=600825
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/editors-picks-best-photo-gear-2018/

    Our annual selection of noteworthy cameras, lenses and accessories.

    The post Editors’ Picks: Best Photo Gear 2018 appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Tue, 11 Dec 2018 23:14:01 +0000

    Photo By Henrik Spranz
    Photo By Henrik Spranz

    Congratulations to Henrik Spranz for winning the recent Motion Blur Assignment with the image, “Weave.”

    "For many weeks I've had the idea to shoot a photo like this using a panning technique combined with an external flash during a heavy snowfall," explains Spranz.
    "All I had to wait for were the perfect conditions. Then the forecast for the next day seemed perfect, so I took a day off work to drive to a forest I know to do some experimental photography. This photo involved using my external flash and panning my camera from top to bottom with a shutter time of 1/3 sec. As I've wanted to have an abstract result, the shutter time was perfect. The curly lines of all the snowflakes falling down added a lot to the impact of the photo. It's a single exposure and I was very happy with the result. With having a concept I've shot many other photos on that day—including another assignment winner."

    See more of Henrik Spranz's work:

    facebook.com/fotomat
    spranz.org
    fairytale-nature.com
    facebook.com/fairytalenature

    The post Motion Blur Assignment Winner Henrik Spranz appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Motion Blur Assignment Winner Henrik Spranz

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=600713
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/motion-blur-assignment-winner-henrik-spranz/

    Photo By Henrik Spranz

    Congratulations to Henrik Spranz for winning the recent Motion Blur Assignment with the image, “Weave.” "For many weeks I've had...

    The post Motion Blur Assignment Winner Henrik Spranz appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Tue, 11 Dec 2018 22:08:07 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Snow King” by Bob Faucher. Location: Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington.
    Photo By Bob Faucher

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Stickwan Creek” by Bob Faucher. Location: Denali Wilderness, Alaska.

    “This lovely little creek, flowing below striking striped hills and snowcapped mountains as it approaches Old Denali Highway, is surrounded by luxurious vegetation in glowing color on a late afternoon in fall,” says Faucher.

    Canon EOS 5D II, Canon EF 28-70mm @ 48mm, Gitzo tripod, RRS BH-55. RAW capture, f/14 @ 1/4 sec, ISO 100, Auto Exposure, Center-weighted-average metering, Auto WB.

    See more of Bob Faucher’s photography at Faucherphotography.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Bob Faucher appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Bob Faucher

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=600718
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-bob-faucher-6/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Stickwan Creek” by Bob Faucher. Location: Denali Wilderness, Alaska. “This lovely little creek, flowing...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Bob Faucher appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Tue, 11 Dec 2018 15:37:54 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Flow of Love” by Jon Reynolds. Location: Crystal, Colorado.
    Photo By Jon Reynolds

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Flow of Love” by Jon Reynolds. Location: Crystal, Colorado.

    “This was taken on Lost Trail Creek near Crystal, Colorado,” says Reynolds. “After a couple of hours on the trail to the town of Crystal, I stopped to capture this leaf on top of a rock as the morning sun caught the golden glow of the aspens behind me.”

    Sony A7RIII, 24-70mm lens, Formatt-Hitech 82mm polarizer. Settings; f22, 3.2 sec., ISO 50 at 34mm.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Jon Reynolds appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Jon Reynolds

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=599907
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-jon-reynolds/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “The Flow of Love” by Jon Reynolds. Location: Crystal, Colorado. “This was taken on...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Jon Reynolds appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Mon, 10 Dec 2018 15:23:46 +0000

    Compose Yourself

    There are a number of conventional words that are associated with how a photo should be composed. Given their definitions, a few seem quite rigid. The thought of how a photo should be composed shouldn’t make one feel uncomfortable. Let’s take a look at how they stack up based on a hierarchy of their rigor.

    Rules: A set of explicit or understood regulations or principles governing a particular activity.

    Pitfalls: A hidden or unsuspected danger or difficulty.

    Criterion: A rule or principle for evaluating or testing.

    Fundamental: A basic principle, rule, law or the like, that serves as the groundwork of a system.

    Guidelines: A general rule, principle or piece of advice.

    As the list progresses, the definitions become less daunting. It’s with this in mind, I prefer the word guideline when I teach composition. I shy away from the word rule. It infers it has to be followed in a specific way, which is way too stringent.

    Composition shouldn’t be “governed.” There are too many circumstances that prove it’s OK to deviate from the norm. Rather than get caught up in a debate over words, I share with you examples where the “rule” fits and also where the rule is broken yet the composition is successful—hence the word “guideline.” To prevent a dispute, let’s continue based on the title of this week’s tip: Compose Yourself—double meanings are always great!

    Compose Yourself

    Balance - A successful composition should have equally weighted subjects on all sides: In the image of the group of trees on the left side, there are no offsetting trees and not a single tree, animal or other primary subject lives on the right. The hill, along with the shadow of the trees, is enough to offset the weight on the left. If I adhered to the above rule, I wouldn’t have been allowed to make this photo. I’m glad I did.

    Compose Yourself

    Leave Room For Implied Movement - The same holds true for the direction in which the subject looks: Avoid placing a subject too close to the edge of a photo when its motion or gaze has it butted up to the side given the direction in which the motion or gaze carries the subject. In the two photos of the merlins in flowers, the one above has the beak right up to the edge of the frame. The area behind the bird is wasted and the bird’s placement is awkward. In the one at the top of the page, there's much less tension as the merlin glances across its body to the other side of the photo.

    Compose Yourself

    Mergers - Never let one subject overlap another: I often avoid pressing the shutter when I know that one animal may protrude from behind or fall in front of another. When I edit, 98 percent of these compositions meet their demise via the delete button. But there are situations that work 2 percent of the time. I tend to edit quickly but not so fast that I don’t overlook an anomaly where everything falls into place. I do refrain from pressing the shutter when I know there will be a merger, but there are times when I proceed and hope. After all, one never knows when it pays to break a rule. When it works, it feels good.

    Compose Yourself

    Leading Line - A leading line should lead the viewer’s eye into the image. They're often placed along the bottom or sides of a photo and should start near the edge. The line should bring the eye to a secondary part of the composition so the viewer can continue to course his or her way through the rest of the composition. In the image of the snow and office building, the leading line follows this rule and certainly works. Also, note the balance of tree trunks on either side of the photo.

    Compose Yourself

    Always Shoot Landscapes 90 Degrees To The Sun - When you point your camera toward the sun, the light is contrasty and shadow detail is lost. Many landscape photographers shy away from this type of light and tell you to always shoot 90 degrees to the sun. It creates texture and a polarizer has its maximum effect so the blue in the sky is enhanced. While these two facts are spot-on true, what if you never experiment? Be a rebel and make some high contrast images. Make photos of subjects where blocked up shadows have no bearing on the outcome of the photo. Look for silhouettes, colorful sunrises or sunsets, or patterns that reflect light.

    Compose Yourself

    Rule Of Thirds: The rule of thirds was initiated by the Renaissance masters. It migrated into photography because it works. While there are times when placing a subject dead center can create a successful piece, it’s important to first learn how to apply the rule of thirds so you learn when the rule can be broken and how to successfully break it. The rule of thirds states you place the primary subject in one of the power points. A power point falls at the intersection of lines if you were to place an imaginary Tic Tac Toe board over the viewfinder. The image of the zebra at sunrise follows the rule of thirds and breaks it by putting the acacia in the center. It’s nice to have the best of both worlds.

    Visit www.russburdenphotography.com for information about his nature photography tours and safari to Tanzania.

     

    The post Compose Yourself appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Compose Yourself

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?post_type=how-to&p=599913
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/tips-techniques/photo-tip-of-week/compose-yourself/

    Compose Yourself

    There are a number of conventional words that are associated with how a photo should be composed. Given their definitions,...

    The post Compose Yourself appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Mon, 10 Dec 2018 08:01:19 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Craving Brownies” by Kelsey Underhill. Location: Alvord Desert, Oregon.
    Photo By Kelsey Underhill

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Craving Brownies” by Kelsey Underhill. Location: Alvord Desert, Oregon.

    Sun setting on the Alvord Desert - emphasizing the beautiful patterns and texture of the Playa,” describes Underhill.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Kelsey Underhill appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Kelsey Underhill

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=599903
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-kelsey-underhill/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Craving Brownies” by Kelsey Underhill. Location: Alvord Desert, Oregon.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Craving Brownies” by Kelsey Underhill. Location: Alvord Desert, Oregon. “Sun setting on the Alvord...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Kelsey Underhill appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Sun, 09 Dec 2018 15:21:31 +0000