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    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Watchman Night” by Kyle Jones. Location: Zion National Park, Utah.
    Photo By Kyle Jones

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Watchman Night” by Kyle Jones. Location: Zion National Park, Utah.

    “This is the iconic shot looking toward the Watchman from Zion's Canyon Junction Bridge,” says Jones. “I timed this shot to get some nice fall color and shot it by the light of a quarter moon to get something a little more unique.”

    See more of Kyle Jones’ photography at www.imageskylejones.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Kyle Jones appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Kyle Jones

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593636
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-kyle-jones-2/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Watchman Night” by Kyle Jones. Location: Zion National Park, Utah.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Watchman Night” by Kyle Jones. Location: Zion National Park, Utah. “This is the iconic...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Kyle Jones appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Tue, 16 Oct 2018 14:38:29 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Yellow Impressions” by Milen Mladenov. Location: Montana.
    Photo By Milen Mladenov

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Yellow Impressions” by Milen Mladenov. Location: Montana.

    “Yellow leaves in a foggy forest were looking like gold during the foggy dusk,” explains Mladenov.

    See more of Milen Mladenov’s photography at resco-photo.blogspot.bg.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Milen Mladenov appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Milen Mladenov

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593633
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-milen-mladenov/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Yellow Impressions” by Milen Mladenov. Location: Montana.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Yellow Impressions” by Milen Mladenov. Location: Montana. “Yellow leaves in a foggy forest were...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Milen Mladenov appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Mon, 15 Oct 2018 14:34:11 +0000

    In a perfect photographic world, with every trip into the field you’d easily encounter the species you want to photograph, it would be cooperative, it would be in an area with an exquisite background, it would make constant eye contact, its young would come out and play, its mate would join in—you get the idea. Of course, the light would also be perfect! For me, it’s all about the light. But since this isn’t how the world works, we sometimes have to take the light we’re given. Day by day, hour by hour and even minute by minute, light can change. It’s with this in mind I share with you the differences in light and the differences it can make in capturing successful images. Additionally, when it’s not perfect, try some of the suggestions below to use the light you’re given to your best advantage.

    1. Front Light With Early/Late Sun

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    All wildlife subjects look fantastic in early and late light. The color is warm, it’s soft, directional and appealing. There’s a golden glow that bathes the animal in shades of orange and yellow, and it lasts for approximately 10 minutes. When you’re blessed with a subject at sunrise and sunset, move to a position where you feel the sun on your back. Another way to look at it is to point your shadow toward the animal. If you use either of these two strategies, the animal will be front lit. Strive to be out at sunrise and sunset if you want to bring your photos to the next level.

    2. Front Light, But a Bit After Sunrise and a Bit Before Sunset

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    As the sun gets higher in the sky, it loses its warmth, but the direction allows you to still make great images. The angle has yet to reach the height where it’s time to put the camera down. Look for subjects offset against an out-of-focus background. Concentrate on smaller animals as they still look appealing because there’s less mass to cause shadows. Again, aim your shadow at the subject and look for a highlight in the eye. Without it, the animal gives the impression it lacks life.

    3. Sidelight

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    Sidelight works well because it means the sun is close to the horizon. As stated above, when it’s at a low angle, the color is warm and engaging. Sidelight does present some challenges, but when everything falls into place, the resulting image has impact. It behooves you to be cognizant of the head angle to make sure light falls on the face, a highlight appears in the eye and the rest of the subject isn’t hidden in shadow. As in the photo of the bull elk, the shadow can add interest because it mimics the shape of the head.

    4. Backlight

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    With animals that have fur or fluffy feathers, I love to use backlight because it creates a glow around its perimeter. This works to your advantage, especially if the background is dark. The glow allows the subject to separate from what would otherwise create a merger of the dark animal against a dark background. Be aware of your exposure to prevent blown out highlights. If the subject is cooperative and there’s 360-degree access, quickly go to the front-lit side of the animal to come back from your shoot with varied options.

    5. Mostly Cloudy

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    Clouds can be advantageous because they allow you to make images during the middle of the day. If the sun was bright and high, you’d see that the light isn’t appealing—it’s way to harsh and contrasty. When clouds are bestowed, bias your exposure toward the right, but don’t spike the highlights. The idea is to open up the shadows as much as possible to add any sparkle that may be hidden given the cloudy conditions.

    6. Bright Overcast

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    Bright overcast is similar to cloudy, but the clouds are thinner. In the best bright overcast condition, soft shadows appear. Again, it expands your photo time throughout the entire day because you don’t have to battle the hard light of noon. Highlights still appear in the subject’s eyes, which is a bonus. My ideal day would be clear mornings and evenings and bright overcast when the sun is high. I could make images the entire day.

    7. Shade

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    When the sun is out and it’s high in the sky, look for animals in the shade. The look it provides falls somewhere in between bright overcast and shade. Trees with dense canopies provide a great source of shade, as does the side of a building. In the photograph of the fox, shade was created by two sources—the shade from the forest and the side of a house. It was photographed in an urban environment. It pays to always have your camera ready, as you never know when a photo opportunity will surface.

    8. Flash As a Main Light

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    There was a time when I really got into photographing insects. It even got to the point where I looked under leaves to find cocoons or a chrysalis and monitored either so I could photograph the moth or butterfly as it emerged. The more I got into it, the more I wanted to use light to my advantage. I wound up creating a mini portrait studio with three flashes and set up a blue background. My main light was mounted in a 12x12 softbox to the right of the insect, a smaller bare flash was placed to the left and I then used another small light to the back and right of the setup to create a rim or accent light. But there were numerous times where it wasn’t practical to carry this setup into the field so I created a mount that attached to my camera onto which I could mount a flash on the right side and another on the left. It was my walk-around mini studio. If you’re into macro bugs, I encourage you to experiment with flash as it allows you to use small f-stops because they provide enough light to make the photo at ƒ/22.

    9. Flash Fill

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    Under cloudy skies, it’s tough to obtain a highlight in the eye. As I mentioned above, a highlight adds life to the subject. To create a natural highlight and to provide a bit more pop to the light, attach a flash but dial it down. Let the ambient light control the exposure. Control the amount of light output from the flash to provide just enough to make the image twinkle. Do this by adjusting the exposure compensation on the back of the flash.

    10. Silhouette

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    I referenced backlight above and mentioned its attributes. To create a silhouette, incorporate the same strategies, but don’t dwell on the fact the sun has to be directly behind the subject. Walk to the left or right of the sun’s path and you’ll be surprised at how far you can deviate and still obtain a silhouette. Be cognizant of the red channel at sunrise and sunset to prevent blowing out the warm tones at these times of the day. If in doubt, err on the side of underexposure.

    Visit www.russburdenphotography.com for information about his nature photography tours and safari to Tanzania.

    The post 10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?post_type=how-to&p=593677
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/tips-techniques/photo-tip-of-week/10-ways-to-work-with-the-light-youre-given/

    10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given

    In a perfect photographic world, with every trip into the field you’d easily encounter the species you want to photograph,...

    The post 10 Ways To Work With The Light You’re Given appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Mon, 15 Oct 2018 07:10:31 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “High Above” by Alexander Meyer. Location: Aoraki/Mt. Cook, New Zealand.
    Photo By Alexander Meyer

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “High Above” by Alexander Meyer. Location: Aoraki/Mt. Cook, New Zealand.

    I spent the summertime on a road trip—in the middle of New Zealand's winter,” says Meyer. “The image was taken out of a small airplane during a scenic flight around Aoraki/Mt. Cook. Probably the best thing I've ever done!”

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Alexander Meyer appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Alexander Meyer

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593630
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-alexander-meyer/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “High Above” by Alexander Meyer. Location: Aoraki/Mt. Cook, New Zealand.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “High Above” by Alexander Meyer. Location: Aoraki/Mt. Cook, New Zealand. “I spent the summertime...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Alexander Meyer appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Sun, 14 Oct 2018 14:29:58 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tumalo Falls” by Stuart Gordon. Location: Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.
    Photo By Stuart Gordon

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tumalo Falls” by Stuart Gordon. Location: Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.

    See more of Stuart Gordon’s photography at chasingthelight.zenfolio.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Stuart Gordon appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Stuart Gordon

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593627
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-stuart-gordon/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tumalo Falls” by Stuart Gordon. Location: Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tumalo Falls” by Stuart Gordon. Location: Deschutes National Forest, Oregon. See more of Stuart...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Stuart Gordon appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Sat, 13 Oct 2018 14:10:18 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Oxbow Bend at Sunset” by Mary Hone. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.
    Photo By Mary Hone

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Oxbow Bend at Sunset” by Mary Hone. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

    “Most people shoot Oxbow Bend early in the morning,” says Hone, “but sunset can be just as dramatic.”

    See more of Mary Hone’s photography at maryhonephotography.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Mary Hone appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Mary Hone

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593623
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-mary-hone/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Oxbow Bend at Sunset” by Mary Hone. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Oxbow Bend at Sunset” by Mary Hone. Location: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. “Most...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Mary Hone appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Fri, 12 Oct 2018 14:01:20 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tahoe Boulders at Sunset 18” by Scott Thompson. Location: Hidden Beach, Lake Tahoe, Nevada.
    Photo By Scott Thompson

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tahoe Boulders at Sunset 18” by Scott Thompson. Location: Hidden Beach, Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

    Thompson describes the image as a ”stitched panoramic photograph of boulders at Hidden Beach, Lake Tahoe. Photographed at sunset with fall colors in the foreground.”

    Equipment: Canon EOS 5DS R, Canon 16-35L lens at 16mm, Lee polarizer, graduated ND filter.

    See more of Scott Thompson’s photography at www.scottshotsphoto.com.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Scott Thompson appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Scott Thompson

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593615
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-scott-thompson/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tahoe Boulders at Sunset 18” by Scott Thompson. Location: Hidden Beach, Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Tahoe Boulders at Sunset 18” by Scott Thompson. Location: Hidden Beach, Lake Tahoe, Nevada....

    The post Photo Of The Day By Scott Thompson appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Thu, 11 Oct 2018 14:44:02 +0000

    Fall Color Photo Tips: Burgess Cemetery in Grafton, Vermont
    One of my favorite spots in the whole world is the Burgess Cemetery in Grafton, Vermont. With the winding road and fall color, this photo just shouts autumn. Nikon D3X, AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm F2.8G ED.

    The fall season always fascinates me. As a professional photographer, I use my home base of New England and the ability to make short trips at “peak” times to capture the colors. With this flexibility, I can stay at one place or move about the half-dozen states that are renown for this yearly display of Mother Nature. In this article, I'll share with you the essential fall color photo tips that will put you on the path to making your own beautiful images of the season.

    When you arrive at your destination, chances are you’ll be overwhelmed by what you see in front of you. Many photographers will argue that the first light is the best of the day. My take here is to stay out all day—the autumn season has more than enough color for me to photograph, especially on a bright fall day, and as the sun moves, the opportunities in the landscape keep changing from sunrise to sunset. You can experiment with side-lighting or backlighting for some impressive results. Out west, the aspens absolutely light up with this type of illumination. In my part of the country, New England, the red maples combined with darker pines always are worth a second look. We get days with brilliant blue skies accented with large, cumulus clouds.

    Fall color photo tips: Above and overlooking Middletown, Vermont.
    Above and overlooking Middletown, Vermont. Nikon D3X, AF-S VR Zoom-NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8G IF-ED.

    Take Advantage Of Nature’s Soft Box

    An overcast day is the best lighting you can have for fall color photography. Mother Nature provides us with a giant diffuser to soften the light while at the same time allowing the colors to come through with a soft saturation not possible with bright sunlight. Colors pop at any angle without the annoying shadows. I like the depth of color on an overcast day, and welcome the occasion to go outside and look for patches of patterns in the trees and the groundcover. To add to the mix, a light drizzle can boost the saturation, and with a polarizer you can get rid of distracting reflections. When shooting on a cloudy, overcast day, try to leave the sky out of the photo by composing tightly on the subject. With no color to speak of, a gray sky is seldom an asset to a radiant color photograph.

    Think About More Than Just The Colors

    Fall is a good time to set your goal on a project, self-assignment or a favored location. Having published a book on the season, I am always on the hunt for new locations to add to this tome. Waterfalls and rolling streams are prime targets, especially on overcast days. Use a good, sturdy tripod and a cable release, and employ the slowest shutter speed you can, stopping the lens down to ƒ/16 or ƒ/22. On a sunny day, I use a Singh-Ray Vari-ND filter that dials in any density up to eight stops of light to allow longer shutter speeds that blur the motion of the falls. On a dreary day, I often don’t even need the Vari-ND filter. I simply set my camera’s ISO to 50 or 100 and use a polarizer to control the light coming into the camera.

    In the fall, my wife and I take long weekends at local B&Bs here in New England. After checking in, we went on a hike and found this delightful setting around a small brook covered with leaves. The day had a perfect overcast and an exposure of 4 sec. at ƒ/9.5 with a polarizer beautifully captured the motion of the water.

    Equipment & Lens Choices For Fall Color

    For capturing a vast expanse of color, wide-angle lenses are a natural. A 24-70mm is perfect for the job. For shooting up and into the trees, wider lenses offer a unique perspective, and for shooting down to include both the groundcover and trees, they’re ideal for scenes where you want sharpness to extend from inches to infinity. With a wide angle, I can draw attention to a colorful palette in the foreground, or I can place something else in the foreground and make use of the vibrant colors in the background.

    Telephoto lenses, on the other hand, can help isolate parts of a colorful forest into interesting shapes and colors, thanks to the depth-flattening effect of the longer focal length. Again, use a sturdy tripod and a cable release, and, if you’re shooting with a DSLR, use live mode to raise the mirror before the shutter goes off for blur-free photographs. Telephoto zooms offer the convenience of staying in one place while you play with composing the forms, patterns and colors in front of you. However, don’t let this versatility lead to complacency; make sure you move around and look for new perspectives.

    I always take along a true macro lens, as lulls in the day’s shooting can be heightened by stretching out the legs of the tripod, getting down and dirty on the ground and exploring for fallen leaves, acorns or patterns formed by a combination of both. Or you can use close-up attachments for occasions when the added weight of a dedicated macro lens may not be desirable. I use a Canon close-up attachment with a 77mm diameter on my Nikon 70-200mm lens to make a useful zoom macro. For dedicated macro work, I like to use a right-angle finder, or, if your camera has one, a swiveling LCD is incredibly convenient.

    Taken on a side road in Vermont. To me, white trees are always interesting with fall foliage. Moving my Nikon D3X slowly in a vertical plane, I used a 3-second exposure at ƒ/29 to create the blur effect. Photos like this take multiple tries, and this one was the best of 14 attempts. Printed on a textured paper, it has the feeling of a fine watercolor or oil painting.

    Use Lighting To Boost Color

    When the available light isn’t ideal, today’s TTL flashes are easy and accurate to use. I like to cut back the power to add just a bit of fill without overpowering the scene. I find that if I dial back about a 2⁄3-stop on the flash, the subject gains a feeling of luminance without being overpowering. Lightweight LED panels are also incredibly useful because you can see the effect as you shoot.

    Another solution is to carry a handheld reflector that folds to a compact size to fit easily into your camera bag. Additionally, consider a visit to your local glass shop, where you can often purchase “scrap” mirrors, and, for a few dollars more, they may polish the edges and round the corners for you. These can be used as reflectors to add light to a scene.

    In the Green Mountains of Vermont, streams are abundant, with this one being a prime example, begging for photography. An overcast day and a 2.5-second exposure at ƒ/11 yielded this pleasant photo. Nikon D3X, AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm F2.8G ED.

    Use A Tripod, But Don’t Get Stuck

    Purchase the best tripod you can afford and be aware that long center columns that make for unsteady support if the wind comes up. There are plenty of excellent models that are lightweight and sturdy and for trekking. I am using a Gitzo GT2542L with an Acratech quick-release ballhead that allows precise adjustments with one knob (as opposed to three on other tripod heads).

    When I’m photographing a colorful fall scene, I like to mount the camera last, not first. I move around looking through the viewfinder, often changing lenses to find the right composition. Then I pull out the tripod and get everything locked down. Attaching the camera first just plants the initial idea into your head that this is the only place to be. Keeping an open mind before settling down is important. After getting a shot you like, remove the camera from the tripod and keep looking, repeating the process. A great fall color scene seldom has only one photo opportunity.

    Be Familiar With Your Equipment

    Out in the field, I see more and more photographers with the latest high-tech cameras. This is great, as long as you are familiar with the workings of your new gear before you leave. Especially when on a workshop or cross-country trip with a short season, bring and use the tools that you are most familiar with, plugging in the newer gear as time permits. You will find yourself less stressed and get better images. You can thank me later!


    See more of Stan Trzoniec’s work at outdoorphotographics.com.

    The post Classic Fall Color Photo Tips appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Classic Fall Color Photo Tips

    http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/how-to/%how-to-category%/classic-fall-color/
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/tips-techniques/nature-landscapes/classic-fall-color/

    Fall Color Photo Tips: Burgess Cemetery in Grafton, Vermont

    Try these fall color photo tips that pros rely on to capture your own beautiful images of the stunning displays of autumn foliage.

    The post Classic Fall Color Photo Tips appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Thu, 11 Oct 2018 07:00:00 +0000

    Photo By Max Foster
    Photo By Max Foster

    Congratulations to Max Foster for winning the recent Summer Road Trips Assignment with the image, “Teton Magic.”

    "I visited Grand Teton National Park in the middle of a 14-month road trip. Camped nearby, I came to this spot several times for sunrise. The view from up there is one of the most impressive mountain scenes I've had the pleasure of witnessing. On this particular morning, I was rewarded with a spectacular light show lasting almost 20 minutes! I took many exposures from mid-range to telephoto, but this shot at 55mm ended up being my favorite.

    Equipment & Settings: Nikon D810, Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 24-85mm F/3.5-4.5G ED VR@ 55mm, Really Right Stuff TVC-34L tripod and BH-55 PCLR ballhead. 1/25 sec., ƒ/9, ISO 64.

    See more of Max Foster’s photography at maxfosterphotography.com and on Facebook and Instagram

    The post Summer Road Trips Assignment Winner Max Foster appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Summer Road Trips Assignment Winner Max Foster

    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593598
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/summer-road-trips-assignment-winner-max-foster/

    Photo By Max Foster

    Congratulations to Max Foster for winning the recent Summer Road Trips Assignment with the image, “Teton Magic.” "I visited Grand...

    The post Summer Road Trips Assignment Winner Max Foster appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Wed, 10 Oct 2018 20:44:01 +0000

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “That little white church” by Alex Speijer. Location: Val di Funes, Italy.
    Photo By Alex Speijer

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “That Little White Church” by Alex Speijer. Location: Val di Funes, Italy.

    “The famous little white St. Johann Church in Val di Funes, Italy," says Speijer. "The European Larch trees make this already-beautiful-in-any-season spot superb.” 

    See more of Alex Speijer’s photography at alexspeijer.photography.

    Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

    The post Photo Of The Day By Alex Speijer appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Photo Of The Day By Alex Speijer

    http://www.outdoorphotographer.com/?p=593529
    https://www.outdoorphotographer.com/blog/photo-of-the-day-by-alex-speijer-3/

    Today’s Photo Of The Day is “That Little White Church” by Alex Speijer. Location: Val di Funes, Italy. “The famous...

    The post Photo Of The Day By Alex Speijer appeared first on Outdoor Photographer.

    Wed, 10 Oct 2018 07:01:07 +0000