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    The post How to Add Functionality to Photoshop CC with Free Extensions appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Glenn Harper.

    Using extensions in Photoshop is like putting scaffolding on Mount Everest. The program already has more features than you probably need. But you can add more functionality by using free extensions. Photoshop CC even invites you to “Find Extensions on Exchange…” on the Windows menu.

    Finding Photoshop extensions

    When browsing the Adobe Exchange site for extensions, take note of what products they’re compatible with. Otherwise, you’ll end up downloading stuff that won’t install. Naturally, free extensions are less likely to be up to date. Some of the paid add-ons are worth a look, with the caveat that you can’t always try them out first.

    Extension installers

    You can install Adobe extensions easily by using either Anastasiy’s Extension Manager or the ZXP Installer. (I use the latter.) Drag the .zxp file onto the app, and the extension will be waiting next time you open Photoshop. (Or at least it should be.) You can also use Adobe’s Creative Cloud desktop app to install and uninstall extensions.

    Installing Photoshop CC extensions

    If your extension doesn’t load automatically through the Creative Cloud app, try Anastasiy’s Extension Manager or the ZXP Installer.

    Three great free extensions

    Some great up-to-date extensions are available for free. They might be a segue from an unpaid product to a paid one or have some other sales angle, but they’re still handy additions to Photoshop.

    Here are three free extensions that work with Photoshop CC in 2019 (version 20.0.4 as I write).

    Adobe Paper Textures Pro (Russell Brown)

    This extension lets you easily add paper textures to photos. The downside is the supplied textures are web-size only, so you can’t add them to big files without losing definition. Of course, it’s designed to hook you into buying full-res textures from Fly Paper. But if you’re into this type of editing, it’s probably worth it, as they appear to be high quality.

    Photoshop texture overlay

    A textured digital photo using one of the supplied Fly Paper overlays in Adobe Paper Textures Pro.

    To make Adobe Paper Textures Pro fully functional without costing you anything, you can download free full-res texture images from other web sources and load those up instead. The textures automatically blend with your open image, so it’s quicker than creating layers manually. In the past, the extension has drawn a few negative reviews. But it has behaved well for me, and despite the odd glitch, it’s a lot of fun to use.

    Adobe Paper Textures Pro and a separately sourced texture overlay.

    Interactive Luminosity Masks (Sven Stork)

    Being able to select different areas of luminosity within an image can be useful when making local edits. You might want to adjust the contrast or tone in one area and not another. Or perhaps you want to avoid sharpening noisy, darker areas of the image or apply noise reduction to the shadows.

    The Interactive Luminosity Mask lets you select highlights, mid-tones or shadows, and also allows a customized choice with a zone mask and picker.

    Using a luminosity mask in Photoshop - free extension

    A luminosity mask exposing shadow areas only for adjustment. You can invert the selection if you want to protect an area rather than edit it.

    The extension also includes saturation masks. These were once useful for selectively increasing saturation, but the vibrance slider made that a little redundant. Even so, there’s still a lot of value in being able to use color to make selections. For instance, you may want to avoid sharpening large single-tone areas such as skies. This add-on lets you select areas of low, mid or high saturation, or manually pick a color using the zone mask. You can even launch channels and commonly used adjustment layers from within the extension.

    Facebook Grid Cover (Bojan Živkovic)

    Photography on Facebook - free extensions

    Facebook grids force you to curate your own photos if you want to create a good one. That’s always a useful exercise. This add-on set of actions works flawlessly.

    Facebook covers may seem like a frivolous way to spend your time. But creating a grid of photos that look good together isn’t always easy. Even with a simple three-image grid, you may find composing a good online triptych challenging. This extension doesn’t end up in your extensions menu. Instead, it’s an action (or series of actions) that loads initially onto your desktop.

    You can pick up to 13 images to go into your Facebook grid cover, and the actions let you switch any one of them as long as the layers remain intact. Whether you run a photographic Facebook page, or just want one for your own cover, this extension will create an eye-catching result.

    Further delights

    Here are some more free extensions for you to try:

    1. Thomas Zagler’s Free Stock Search is ideal for finding free stock images you can use for things such as digital composites. You could compile a folder of free texture photos and use them with the Adobe Paper Textures Pro extension I talked about earlier.
      Free stock search - free extension

      Free stock photos are useful for overlays in Photoshop. Add texture to your photos or drop in a better sky.

    2. Sven Stork’s Interactive Blender Panel lets you blend pictures together according to tone (highlights, mid-tones, or shadows) and leave the rest of the photo unblended. This is ideal for dropping in more appealing skies, among other things.

      Digitally adding skies in Photoshop

      This is another first-rate offering from Sven Stork. Adding better skies is one use for blending pictures by tone. You can use a layer mask to brush out any unwanted blending.

    3. Anil Tejwani’s Action Launcher provides useful ways to organize your actions, including alphabetically or by favorites. Note: The favorites feature expires after 30 days unless you upgrade to the pro version.

      Photoshop free extensions

      Action Launcher lets you easily filter and organize your actions.

    4. Davide Barranca’s PS Tools lets you lay out all the Photoshop tools you actually use in a pop-out panel and conceal the rest.

      Photoshop tools

      This extension lets you lay out all the tools you usually use and hide the rest. (Note: The panel doesn’t float. The illustration shows screenshots of editing pane and selected tools.)

    5. Denis Yanov’s RealLookLongShadow panel gives you lots of control over drop shadows and their length to make photos or cut-outs stand out.

      Photoshop drop shadows - free extensions

      This extension lets you create longer shadows than is usually possible within Photoshop.

    Your recommendations

    I hope you find some of these extensions useful or fun. Please feel free to add your own recommendations for free or paid extensions in the comments.

     

    The post How to Add Functionality to Photoshop CC with Free Extensions appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Glenn Harper.

    How to Add Functionality to Photoshop CC with Free Extensions

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169538
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/ajaPK7lQ9UQ/

    The post How to Add Functionality to Photoshop CC with Free Extensions appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Glenn Harper.

    Using extensions in Photoshop is like putting scaffolding on Mount Everest. The program already has more features than you probably need. But you can add more functionality by using free extensions. Photoshop CC even invites you to “Find Extensions on Exchange…” on the Windows menu. Finding Photoshop extensions When browsing the Adobe Exchange site for […]

    The post How to Add Functionality to Photoshop CC with Free Extensions appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Glenn Harper.

    Tue, 21 May 2019 14:00:00 +0000

    The post How to Pose Grooms and Groomsmen Effectively appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    Wedding days aren’t just about the bride, even though it might seem that way. As photographers we must also take photos of the groom by himself and with his groomsman buddies – whether they like it or not.

    Posing the groom alone

    When posing the groom alone you often see stiffness and shifting eyes because most men don’t feel  comfortable having their photo taken. So it’s worth starting a conversation that has nothing to do with the wedding to relax them and settle their nerves.

    Find a nice background where you can photograph the groom at three different crops: full-body, half-body, and close-up. These three crops will add variety to your portraits, and give you more options when choosing the best portrait to deliver to your clients.

    For example, window lighting can add dimension and depth while the groom is adjusting his tie or watch, or buttoning his shirt. Have the groom look out the window, or at his watch or tie. This keeps his hands busy, and because he’s not looking at the camera he won’t feel as vulnerable.

    When you’re outside you can have the groom lean on a wall, or simply stand in the middle of a walkway. To help him pose naturally, tell him to stand as if he was by himself and not getting his photo taken.

    Also, remind him to breathe. The stiffness is often caused by the groom holding his breath. It will also help him relax his shoulders and overall stance.

    Photographing the groom at three different crops is a great way to add variety to the final images.

    If the groom usually puts his hand in a pocket, have him put the one furthest from the camera into his pocket. This can help make the portrait feel more natural. Having the groom look at various points beyond the camera (to the side, behind you, or even at his shoes) can reduce the nerves and stiffness, and make him feel more comfortable.

    As you’re taking the groom’s portraits, feel free to joke around, talk about things they like, or simply compliment them. This can make them feel more comfortable and bring about natural smiling and laughing, as well as fill in the silence.

    Sitting is another great way to pose the groom. Have him sit on steps, a short wall or a chair. It will make the groom feel less stiff, and allow you to focus on various details of his outfit such as his shoes or socks if he chose something special.

    Portraits of the groom while with the bride

    But the groom doesn’t have to be completely alone in his portraits. A beautiful portrait of the groom with his bride can isolate him while placing him in the overall story of the wedding day.

    Pose the couple facing each other, and ask the bride to place her head on his chest or arm to bring her face out a little. Then have her close her eyes while you direct the groom to look at the camera.

    Another great portrait is having the groom at a 45-degree angle, with the bride behind him. Ask her to put her head on his back/shoulders, and have him look either directly at you or off into the distance.

    He doesn’t have to smile. He can even look a little more serious. But the big picture will still look romantic and show that the couple is sharing a special moment.

    You can move the groom and bride from there and create variations where the groom is:

    These will all make great portraits of the groom and help him pose with his bride.

    Groomsmen

    Groomsmen are really fun to photograph. Most of the time they’re buddies and will joke around a bit, which can make for great candid photos. But it can also mean they won’t take the photo shoot seriously.

    One way to get them to listen and cooperate is to let them know the faster they get through the photo shoot, the sooner they can start having fun. But don’t use this trick until you’ve captured some candids showing how they all interact, as it will be nice for the groom to have those as well.

    Keep at least three different groomsmen setups in mind before photographing the wedding. You can find inspiration online and save those inspirational photos on your phone to recreate or build on them. This can save you lots of time if you’re new to wedding photography.

    Try and keep the conversation light and easygoing. It will help the groomsmen relax, and you’ll get much more authentic expressions from them.

    Group huddles and hugs are great icebreakers, and can lighten the mood if you feel the photos are getting a little stiff or the groomsmen are losing steam. A slow walking photo is also nice to have and having them looking at each other and talking is a great way to get them all smiling.

    A staggered photo, either on a staircase or in a big area, can provide you with more varied poses for your final photos. If you have enough time, get a photo of each groomsman with the groom. Keep the photos moving by keeping the groom in the same place and having the groomsmen take turns standing beside him.

    Keep everyone’s height variations in mind when taking photos of the groom with his groomsmen. Taller groomsmen may need to stand further back. If there are big height differences between the groom and his groomsmen, place those who are about the same height next to the groom, or bring the groom closer to the camera. This can help isolate the groom and make him the focal point of the photo, which is exactly what you want.

    Keep everyone moving and try to get the photos done quickly. Groomsmen are usually ready for the next event pretty quickly and get sick of the camera much faster than the bride and bridesmaids.

    If the groomsmen have ideas for poses, go along with them. It may be an inside joke or something that brings them closer together as buddies. And they’re usually the photos they love to remember.

    Also, always ask if the groomsmen are wearing something special or have a gift from the couple – watches, socks, matching shoes, flasks, etc. These items have far more meaning when they’re photographed in the hands of those who received or are wearing them.

    For example, these groomsmen all received personalized flasks from the groom, so a toasting photo was fun to create for them, along with a close-up of one of the flasks.

    In conclusion

    Grooms and groomsmen are fun to photograph during a wedding. But it’s best to have a few poses in mind so you can work quickly, as they often don’t like having their photos taken and may tire quickly. Keeping the mood light and fun gives them a great experience, and they’ll look back at the photos with fond memories.

    dps-How-to-Pose-Grooms-and-Groomsmen-Effectively

    The post How to Pose Grooms and Groomsmen Effectively appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    How to Pose Grooms and Groomsmen Effectively

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169502
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/2EA4xaNMxqI/

    The post How to Pose Grooms and Groomsmen Effectively appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    Wedding days aren’t just about the bride, even though it might seem that way. As photographers we must also take photos of the groom by himself and with his groomsman buddies – whether they like it or not. Posing the groom alone When posing the groom alone you often see stiffness and shifting eyes because […]

    The post How to Pose Grooms and Groomsmen Effectively appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    Mon, 20 May 2019 19:00:17 +0000

    The post Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Lily Sawyer.

    Outfits can make or break a photo shoot. No matter how beautiful your photos are, if the outfits aren’t right it can affect the look and feel of the photographs.

    I wouldn’t have said this before, but now I know from experience.

    1 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    Before each photo shoot, I send my client an article and encourage them to read it. I then ask them to send me some of their outfit ideas so we can discuss their choices. The client plays the most important role in the photo shoot, and so while I offer advice on what to wear, I  also like to tailor their photo shoot to match their preferences and personalities.

    Here are some factors that help my client and I come to a decision on the right outfits for a successful photo shoot. Naturally, the outfits need to be right for the client. But they also need to be right for you as the photographer.

    2 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    Type of photoshoot

    Chances are you already know this from the booking and/or your niche (if you have one). But in case you don’t, here are some photo shoots you may be asked to do:

    3 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    Type of client

    From my experience, clients generally fall into one of two types: styled or casual.

    Styled clients think about every detail of their shoot including:

    Casual clients just want some memories captured, usually showcasing their usual attires and what they do as a family. They’re not too fussed about location or outfits, they just want lovely photos of their family or themselves and have the digital files stored safely so they can print them whenever they want.

    In both cases, I still try to get together with them to discuss their outfits and plan the photo shoot.

    Theme or no theme

    When it comes to themes, the possibilities are limitless. But I always advise my clients to narrow it down to a handful of choices and keep things simple within their chosen theme. For me, a theme just provides context. The focus is still the client looking good in their photographs, looking natural in the context, and loving the way they look in them.

    Keeping it simple is best.

    4 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    Location of the shoot

    Rather than talk about differences between studio and outdoor locations (which are pretty obvious), I want to focus on what’s important when choosing outdoor locations to fit a client’s outfits and vice versa.

    If they’ve put a lot of work into choosing outfits (and perhaps props), a location that provides a simple but effective background will work best. So having outfits that suit the location is crucial.

    If you’re shooting in a busy location (e.g. city, market, funfair) where you can’t avoid being surrounded by people, I’d suggest plain, non-printed outfits. This will help you isolate your clients so they’re still the focus amidst the busy setting. When I shoot in these locations, I sometimes blur the background or drag the shutter to blur everything but the client.

    5 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    If the location is a park where you can find a quiet spot and use trees, foliage or sky as the background, then they can wear florals and busy patterns. You can isolate them by blurring the background when shooting so you get creamy bokeh in a very shallow depth of field.

    You can also do silhouettes. This works well if they’re wearing outfits that are similar to each other (e.g. simple jackets or trench coats).

    Here are some other locations you could choose:

    While I try to minimize stark contrast within the outfits themselves, I try to maximize the contrast between the outfits and the location. In other words, plain outfits in busy locations and busy outfits in plain locations.

    6 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    Time of the year

    This is pretty self-explanatory, except I want to add one word: options. I encourage my clients to have a change of outfits in case they want a different look. Some take up the offer, while others don’t. The weather in the UK can change quite dramatically. In autumn and spring, we can have all four seasons in one day.

    So during this time, I encourage my clients to dress in layers. If the sun comes out they can take a layer off. If it rains we can do some shots with an umbrella. If we’re suddenly plunged into winter, we can add a couple of layers for a cozy look in a cafe, complete with hot chocolate topped with marshmallows.

    But make sure you factor the weather, outfits and any activities (boating, cycling, etc.) into your shoot so you don’t run over time.

    Your style/niche

    You may have been told you should have a niche, and shoot only within that niche. That’s a nice ideal, but it isn’t true (or easy) for everyone. Sure, some people may not be your ideal client. But if they like your pictures, want you to photograph them and will pay you for it, would you turn them down?

    And while you may not showcase their photos on your blog because of the niche and brand you’re trying to build, if they don’t mind then why not do it? Yes, the photos in your portfolio, on your website and in your social media messages will help you attract those ideal clients. But here I’m talking about those who want you to photograph them regardless.

    7 - Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    General outfit advice

    Bearing all of this in mind, here’s my general advice regarding outfits.

    Classic: Timeless style, chinos, khakis, beige and blues, nature-hues, pastels, shirts, and simple dresses.

    Florals and prints: Just florals, or an eclectic mix of prints and patterns. Pairing them with stripes can also work sometimes.

    Colors: Keep them complementary as opposed to completely matching (e.g. all white shirts and blue jeans). Avoid stark contrasts such as green and orange/red together, and yellows and purples juxtaposed. Complementary colors are more like warm tones (yellows, oranges, pinks, warm red and even warm greens) together and cool tones (blues, purples, greens) together. But an explosion of bright colors could also work, although I’d shoot it on a plain background or setting.

    Consistency: Avoid extreme differences (e.g. one person is wearing a casual knitted chunky sweater and the other is wearing a nice silky dress). It can be quite jarring. Black and white is another combination that’s too stark a contrast unless it’s done intentionally.

    Dark, light and bright: Darks for adults, and lights or brights for small children. Do it the other way and the adults will dominate the scene and draw the viewer’s attention, while the smaller people will disappear.

    dps-what-to-advise-clients-photoshoot-outfits

    We all have our own personal preferences and styles. These are mine, but if you have other ideas for your photo shoots that’s okay.

    If you have any other helpful advice, please share it with us in the comments.

     

    The post Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Lily Sawyer.

    Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169729
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/2i1Srw6Facw/

    The post Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Lily Sawyer.

    Outfits can make or break a photo shoot. No matter how beautiful your photos are, if the outfits aren’t right it can affect the look and feel of the photographs. I wouldn’t have said this before, but now I know from experience. Before each photo shoot, I send my client an article and encourage them […]

    The post Advising Clients What to Wear for a Photo Shoot appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Lily Sawyer.

    Mon, 20 May 2019 14:00:00 +0000

    The post 5 Tips for Stunning Macro Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

    Do you want to capture gorgeous macro photography?

    Macro photography might feel like a struggle. But it doesn’t have to be. By using a few simple tricks you can capture amazing macro photos consistently.

    So if you’re interested in taking your macro images to the next level, follow these five tips.

    1. Simplify your macro composition’s subjects and colors

    All great macro photos have a carefully chosen composition. That is, the elements in the photos have been arranged in the most beautiful way possible.

    So if you want to capture amazing macro photography, you need to carefully choose your compositions, too.

    And the number one rule of composition?

    Simplify, simplify, simplify.

    Start by choosing a subject for your photo. Something that stands out – ideally the thing that initially drew you to the scene.

    And once you’ve found your subject, hit your viewer over the head with it. Remove any distractions from the scene. If there are stray twigs in the background, remove them. If there’s something unpleasant in the foreground, change your angle.

    The goal is to isolate your subject in every way possible. You want the viewer to know exactly what they’re supposed to look at.

    But as well as removing all the physical distractions, you should also remove all the distracting colors.

    A macro photo should have three colors or fewer – four if you’re really struggling. But no more than that.

    Because too many colors cause chaos.

    And in macro photography you absolutely need to avoid chaos.

    You need to simplify.

    2. Increase the subject-to-background distance for beautiful macro backgrounds

    Now you understand the importance of simplifying. But it’s not just the subject of the photo you need to simplify. You also need to simplify the background.

    The best macro photography backgrounds are clean, simple and uniform. They don’t take away from the subject. Instead, they complement the subject and help it stand out.

    But how do you create such a simple, clean background?

    One way is to increase the distance between the subject and the background, and use a very wide aperture (something in the f/2.8 to f/4 range).

    Why? Because the farther the subject is from the background, the greater the aperture needed to keep everything in focus. And so at very wide apertures the whole background becomes  wonderfully blurry.

    This background blur is called bokeh. And macro photographers love it because it helps the subject to stand out.

    Just remember that when it comes to macro photography backgrounds, blurrier is almost always better.

    So use a wide aperture, and increase the subject to background distance.

    You’ll get far better shots that way.

    3. Focus manually for the best macro photography detail

    Do you ever struggle to nail the focus while doing macro photography?

    It’s a common problem. Since you’re working at such high magnifications, the autofocus on your lens will undoubtedly struggle. And it’ll often miss your point of focus entirely.

    Fortunately, there’s a simple workaround for this problem: manual focus.

    Manual focus lets you change the point of focus using the ring on the lens. Twist the lens ring and the focus moves, allowing you to focus close, far away, then close again without using the lens’s autofocus.

    This is extremely useful for macro photography. Even at high magnifications, you’ll be able to consistently nail the focus.

    As long as you switch over to manual focus, of course.

    A couple of tips:

    Manual focus may take a bit of practice to master. But it’ll be worth it in the end.

    4. Shoot into the sun for amazing background bokeh

    Now we’ve reached the fun part of this article: How to generate gorgeous background bokeh.

    As I mentioned earlier, bokeh refers to a beautiful blurry background.

    And here’s the thing: If you can create amazing bokeh in your macro photos you’re practically guaranteed a great shot, because it will make your shot stand out from the crowd.

    But how do you capture stunning bokeh?

    Here’s one simple trick you can use: shoot into the sun.

    First, wait until the sun is low in the sky (early morning or late afternoon).

    Next, find a subject and place that subject between you and the sun. Crouch down low so the sun is behind your subject.

    Now, move around until you find an area where the sun is broken up by something – tree branches, leaves, etc. You want the sun to shine through these tree branches, hit your subject, and then hit you.

    Why is this so important?

    Well, broken sunlight ultimately creates the best bokeh. Those smaller pinpricks of sunlight produce amazing backgrounds.

    Note: You don’t want the full sun in your frame. Otherwise the sky will be far too bright and your picture will lack serious detail. Instead, block the sunlight with your subject. If you like, let the sun peek out from behind. (In fact, this can result in some especially interesting effects.)

    Bottom line?

    If you can create amazing bokeh, your macro photography will be stunning. So create it whenever possible.

    5. Find shade-sun combinations for gorgeous colors

    Here’s a final macro photography tip for you (and one of my favorites).

    If you want to create wonderful, pastel-like colors in your macro photos, use shade-sun combinations.

    When the sun is low in the sky, go out looking for subjects. Shadows will be long, so you shouldn’t have any problem finding a nice subject in the shade.

    Get ready to photograph that subject. But before you actually take the shot, carefully position yourself so the background of the shot is sun-drenched.

    This works amazingly well, because the sunny background will be soft and golden. And golden light is amazing for bokeh.

    You’ll capture photos like this:

    And this:

    With a bit of patience, you should be able to find many great backgrounds by using this trick.

    So don’t forget to try it.

    Stunning macro photography: next steps

    Capturing amazing macro photos doesn’t have to be hard. You just have to know a few tricks.

    For instance, you have to simplify your compositions.

    You have to create beautiful backgrounds.

    And you have to focus manually.

    If you can do that, your macro photos will be amazing in no time at all.

    We’d love you to go out and try these techniques, and share your macro photos with us in the comments below.

    The post 5 Tips for Stunning Macro Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

    5 Tips for Stunning Macro Photography

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169310
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/AO5w2NPt6MM/

    The post 5 Tips for Stunning Macro Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

    Do you want to capture gorgeous macro photography? Macro photography might feel like a struggle. But it doesn’t have to be. By using a few simple tricks you can capture amazing macro photos consistently. So if you’re interested in taking your macro images to the next level, follow these five tips. 1. Simplify your macro […]

    The post 5 Tips for Stunning Macro Photography appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jaymes Dempsey.

    Sun, 19 May 2019 19:00:59 +0000

    The post How to Turn Day to Night Using Photoshop for Urban Landscapes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ana Mireles.

    Have you ever wished you’d photographed something at night? You may not have had the time, knowledge, or gear to do it, but you still regret not getting that shot.

    In some cases you may be able to return at night and have another go. But if you can’t, you can quickly turn day to night with Photoshop.

    In this article I’ll show you how you to turn your daytime urban scene into a nighttime one using layers and masks. I’ll also give you a few tips on the details you should take care of for a more realistic effect.

    But first I want to explain the idea behind this technique so you can apply it to all kinds of photography.

    The blue night and the yellow light

    You may have noticed that different lights have different colors. Sunsets are redder and warmer than the sunlight at noon. The table lamp from your bedroom is more yellow than the fluorescent light of an office building. And so on.

    This is called the color temperature, and is measured in Kelvin degrees. (You can see it in full in this color temperature scale.) And you can take advantage of it to simulate night time by colorizing your image accordingly.

    Make it night

    First, you need to change the white daylight into a dark blue that corresponds to the night light by adding a blue layer. You can do this in various ways, although I find the easiest way it to select Layer -> New Adjustment Layer -> Color Lookup… from the menu and clicking OK.

    From the Properties panel, open the top drop-down menu and choose any option that gives you a blue tone such as Moonlight, Foggy night, or Night from Day.

    If you’re more experienced, and want to to have full control, you can work with a RAW file. At the top of the adjustment panel of the ACR window is a slider where you can adjust the color temperature. You can also enter the Kelvin degrees value you want directly according to the scale I mentioned before.

    Turn the lights up

    Next, create another layer that’s yellow or amber. If you’re using Adjustment Layers, remember to duplicate of the original first and then add the color one on top of it. If you’re sticking with the Color Lookup adjustment layer style choose Edgy Amber or Candlelight. Once you have it, merge the adjustment layer with the copy you created from the original.

    If you’re doing it from ACR, don’t just duplicate your layer. Use the Create a New Smart Object via Copy option instead, or the first layer will go yellow too. You can find this option by right-clicking the layer and choosing it from the menu. Then double-click on the thumbnail to open ACR again and drag the slider to the yellow side.

    You now need to add a mask to this yellow layer. You can do this by clicking on the Layer mask button on the bottom of the panel. Once you’ve created it, click Invert in the properties panel. We do it this way because the white mask will show all the content and the black one will block all of it. (To learn more about it, check out Getting Started with Layer Masks in Photoshop – a Beginners Tutorial.) For now you’ll want it all covered so you can paint only what you need to in the next step.

    The yellow corresponds to the tungsten light from light bulbs, which you can use to paint lamp posts, windows and any other source of light that might be available during night time. Identify these sources and, using the Brush tool, start painting in the Layer Mask with the brush set to white.

    For windows, I find it easier to paint the entire rectangle and then paint out the divisions with the black brush.

    This also works for any corrections or detailed work. If you paint something by accident, change the color of the brush to black and paint back over it to cover it again. This is why we’re using masks. The work is non-destructive, and you can easily go back and forth.

    The Giveaways

    It’s up to you how much work you want to put into the transformation. But keep in mind that the more details you do, the more realistic the effect looks.

    For example, the lamp will shed some light onto the wall where it’s hanging, so you’ll want to illuminate that part as well. With the same Brush tool you were using, diminish the opacity from the Options Bar and paint the wall where the light would be hitting. Keep diminishing the opacity as you get further away from the light source.

    Another big giveaway is reflective surfaces because light would reflect onto them. In this example, the water in the canals needs to have reflected light. But it may also be needed for cars or puddles, so keep an eye on your scene and paint those as well.

    There you have it: from day to night using nothing more than  layers and masks.

    I hope you enjoyed this technique. I recommend you go out and do some night photography so you can learn how light, tones and colors behave. The more you understand it, the better you will be able to replicate it in post-production.

    If you need some help getting started, check out The Ultimate Guide to Night Photography.

    And to get some inspiration for your next digitally created night scenes, here are two great articles:

    The post How to Turn Day to Night Using Photoshop for Urban Landscapes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ana Mireles.

    How to Turn Day to Night Using Photoshop for Urban Landscapes

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=170951
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/Rp-CJvnmANo/

    The post How to Turn Day to Night Using Photoshop for Urban Landscapes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ana Mireles.

    Have you ever wished you’d photographed something at night? You may not have had the time, knowledge, or gear to do it, but you still regret not getting that shot. In some cases you may be able to return at night and have another go. But if you can’t, you can quickly turn day to […]

    The post How to Turn Day to Night Using Photoshop for Urban Landscapes appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ana Mireles.

    Sun, 19 May 2019 14:00:38 +0000

    The post 3 Fun Backgrounds for Portraits and Photo Booths You Can Create at Home appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Erin Fitzgibbon.

    Bring out your Creativity

    With our phones becoming an essential tool in our lives, we’ve started integrating them into our daily routines. We use them to document events and milestones, and then share them on social media.

    One trend that seems set to continue is having photo booths at events and even gatherings. Guests are invited to shoot photos in front of a fun background to help document the memories of that special day.

    And photographers are always looking for great studio backdrops to help make portraits interesting.

    Keeping both scenarios in mind, I’ve put together three examples of easy-to-create backdrops that can be used in all sorts of situations. So whether you’re a serious portrait photographer who wants to create something unique for your business or a creative individual who wants to give your guests with something fun during an event, here are step-by-step instructions for creating some pretty cool backgrounds.

    1# String and a Theme

    For this creative effort all you need is a lot of string and some paper clips. I’ve used this technique with everything from displaying art to creating a fun backdrop  for portraits in support of Down Syndrome awareness.

    (The creases in the fabric can easily be removed in Photoshop. I just wanted to show exactly how it looked.)

    Created using some friends’ socks, two pieces of white fabric and some push pins.

    The steps are quite simple.

    1. Get some string. (I’m partial to either black string or brown hemp-based string.)
    2. Using strong tape or hooks, run the string back and forth across the area you’ll be shooting. This works best on a blank wall or a plain backdrop cloth. (If you don’t have a backdrop cloth, iron a bed sheet and hang it up using thumbtacks.)
    3. Attach whatever theme items you’ve chosen at random places along the string using paper clips.
    4. Take some test photos to make sure you like the look of your backdrop.

     

    I hung the socks from the string using bobby pins.

    Here’s a background we made for a school. The design was created for World Down Syndrome Day. Everyone was encouraged to raise awareness by wearing crazy socks. So we created this simple background and then took photos of the students in front of the socks. It was easy to set up, and a lot of fun to shoot.

     

    2# Paint Splatters and a Tri-Fold Display Board

    Remember those tri-fold display boards we all bought to make our science fair projects? Well, here’s a backdrop you can make using that school day staple. It’s also easy to transport – just fold it up and away you go. It’s also a great way to use up any paint you have sitting around in the basement. 

    I used some acrylic paint and a palette knife for this background. I decided to smear it this time, but you can also splatter the paint.

    1. Buy a tri-fold display board (black or white) from the dollar store.
    2. Choose some paint colors that go with your theme (or use whatever you have lying around in the basement). If the paint is too thick to splatter, adding water can help make it more pliable.
    3. Take the tri-fold board outside (or put down a lot of newspaper on the kitchen floor).
    4. Using a variety of brush sizes, randomly drip, splash or flick paint onto the tri-fold.
    5. Let it dry for several hours before moving the board.

    If you load the knife with a few colors and drag it across the palette you get lots of mixing and color variation.

    Here’s the full tri-fold display board. While the background isn’t very big, it’s quite portable. However, it does limit how much you see. But keep in mind you can always use a zoom lens and have your subject stand at a distance from the background. After all, a lot of DIY is about making do with what you have.

    A simply white tri-board can be really useful. And in a pinch it can also be used as a reflector.

    3# Brown Paper and Old Books

    For this one you’ll need a roll of craft paper, which you can either hang from a studio backdrop or improvise by taping it to the wall. But you’ll have to be gentle with this backdrop, and if your guests or clients aren’t careful they could easily rip the paper.

    Next, choose some books that have significance to your event. If it’s a baby shower, old children’s books might be a good choice for the background.

    (I realize that some people think dismantling a book for a backdrop is blasphemous. Personally, I think it’s a great way to give it another purpose instead of having it just sit on the shelf. If this really bothers you, use newspapers instead.)

    1. Gather up old books you won’t be reading again, or visit the library and ask for any damaged books they’ll be throwing away. Flea markets and garage sales are also great places to find books.
    2. Cut pages out of the books that you find visually appealing
    3. Glue the pages to the long strip of brown craft paper you hung up
    4. Apply as many pages as you see fit. (You may want to use only a few pages, while someone else may want to completely cover the brown paper.)
    5. Carefully adjust the roll of paper so guests can easily stand in front of your backdrop

    I used pages from an old Writer’s Market to create this background. The nice thing is I can roll it up and take it anywhere.

    I also like the look of this background with a black and white treatment.

    A classic black and white portrait in front is quite pleasing.

    Other Ideas

    Here’s are some more ideas for backgrounds.

    1. Run party streamers diagonally down the wall in a variety of colors.
    2. Hang homemade snowflakes from the ceiling.
    3. Hang Christmas lights behind a bed sheet for a glowing look.
    4. Collect fall leaves and glue them to brown paper.
    5. Use old rolls of wallpaper and drape them behind your subject. (No gluing required.)

    There are countless ways to create an inspiring look for portraits. Don’t be afraid to be creative and use items you have lying around the house. And please share your ideas and examples. We’d love to see what items you use to make something truly fun and creative. 

    The post 3 Fun Backgrounds for Portraits and Photo Booths You Can Create at Home appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Erin Fitzgibbon.

    3 Fun Backgrounds for Portraits and Photo Booths You Can Create at Home

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169070
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/jzfJNBHeOKM/

    The post 3 Fun Backgrounds for Portraits and Photo Booths You Can Create at Home appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Erin Fitzgibbon.

    Bring out your Creativity With our phones becoming an essential tool in our lives, we’ve started integrating them into our daily routines. We use them to document events and milestones, and then share them on social media. One trend that seems set to continue is having photo booths at events and even gatherings. Guests are […]

    The post 3 Fun Backgrounds for Portraits and Photo Booths You Can Create at Home appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Erin Fitzgibbon.

    Sat, 18 May 2019 19:00:01 +0000

    The post How to Create and Use a Light Skin Smoothing Action in Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    When you photograph portraits, you’ll spend time editing the photos so your clients look their very best. A lot of that time is often spent smoothing out the skin. But while some smoothing is okay, doing it too much can change the look of the person.

    Here’s how to create a simple and easy Photoshop action that will have you smoothing out skin faster without over-retouching it.

    Before and after using this light skin smoothing action.

    What is a Photoshop Action?

    A Photoshop action is where you record various steps in an editing process and save them so you can then reapply those steps simply by ‘playing’ the action.

    In this case, the action will have three steps. When you press ‘Play’ it will apply those three steps quickly and automatically so you can get to the fun part – the retouching.

    Create the action

    Step 1: Open a photo (any photo will do) so you can create the action.

    Step 2: Make sure the Actions panel is open. If it isn’t, go to the Window menu and make sure Actions is selected. If you can’t find the Actions panel on your workspace, deselect and re-select it in the menu.

    Step 3: Create an Action Set, which will create a master folder for your action to live in and help you organize your actions. (You can skip this step if you already have one.) Click on the three lines in the Actions panel and select New Set. You can also create it by clicking the folder icon at the bottom of the Actions panel. You can give it any name you like. (In this example I named it “My actions”.)

    Step 4: Now it’s time to record the action. Select New Action from the Actions panel menu, or click the New icon at the bottom. Choose a name for your action, select the set you want it stored in, and click Record.

    Note: Once you hit record, everything you do in Photoshop will be recorded – including the things you did accidentally. Fortunately, you can click the Record and Stop buttons at any time while you’re recording the steps.

    Step 5: Once you start recording your action, duplicate your layer in the layers panel or by hitting CMD/CTRL+J.

    Step 6: From the Photoshop menu select Filters ->Blur -> Gaussian Blur and choose a value between 10 and 25 pixels. (Don’t worry. Your photo won’t stay blurry.)

    Step 7: Create a mask layer, then hold down the Alt/Option key and click on the mask. This will add a black mask on your blur, and your photo will be back to normal. We’ll be using this mask to add the smoothing rather than erase the blur, which is a lot more work.

    Step 8: Select the Brush tool (or press B on the keyboard), and choose an opacity between 10% and 20%. Make sure your foreground color is set to white so you can paint back the smoothing.

    Step 9: Hit Stop to stop recording.

    Your action is now ready to use.

    To test your action, open a new photo and hit Play in the Actions panel.

    You’ll see the actions you recorded re-applied to the new photo.

    How to use your action

    Open a photo with the skin you want to smooth out. It’s best if you retouch any imperfections or blemishes beforehand. This action simply smoothes out the skin lightly to make it look natural and clean.

    Hit Play on your action, choose a brush size that’s best for your photo and start painting in the smoothing in small strokes. Make sure you paint in the mask layer or you’ll be painting white onto the skin.

    You should see the difference after a few strokes. You can also change the opacity if you need more or less smoothing.

    Tips

    If you accidentally record extra steps, simply stop the recording and then delete the steps that aren’t part of the action.

    You can also delete the action and start over. So don’t worry if you don’t get each step right the first time.

    In conclusion

    Retouching skin can often take time away from photographing clients. But by using actions, you can streamline your editing by automating steps you use regularly.

    This action also helps you retouch photos lightly and more naturally.

    Let us know if you find it helpful.

    The post How to Create and Use a Light Skin Smoothing Action in Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    How to Create and Use a Light Skin Smoothing Action in Photoshop

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=169072
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/Ira5pkyx8Rw/

    The post How to Create and Use a Light Skin Smoothing Action in Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    When you photograph portraits, you’ll spend time editing the photos so your clients look their very best. A lot of that time is often spent smoothing out the skin. But while some smoothing is okay, doing it too much can change the look of the person. Here’s how to create a simple and easy Photoshop […]

    The post How to Create and Use a Light Skin Smoothing Action in Photoshop appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Jackie Lamas.

    Sat, 18 May 2019 14:00:20 +0000

    The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Macro appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    This week’s photography challenge topic is MACRO!

    Image by Jaymes Dempsey.

    Go out and capture flowers, objects, insects etc. Just be sure they are really close up! They can be color, black and white, moody or bright. You get the picture! Have fun, and I look forward to seeing what you come up with!

    Image by Rick Ohnsman.

    Check out some of the articles below that give you tips on this week’s challenge.

    Tips for Shooting MACRO

    Macro Photography on a Budget: An introduction to Close-up Filters

    Getting Started with Abstract Macro Photography

    How to Give Your Macro Photography a Fine Art Touch in Post-Processing

    5 Surprising Macro Photography Ideas to Jumpstart Your Creativity

    Reverse Lens Macro – How to Make Macro Photos with “Backward Thinking”

    Creative Macro Photography – Using Fairy Lights

    How to Choose the Perfect Macro Lens

    Weekly Photography Challenge – MACRO

    Simply upload your shot into the comment field (look for the little camera icon in the Disqus comments section) and they’ll get embedded for us all to see or if you’d prefer, upload them to your favorite photo-sharing site and leave the link to them. Show me your best images in this week’s challenge.

    Share in the dPS Facebook Group

    You can also share your images in the dPS Facebook group as the challenge is posted there each week as well.

    If you tag your photos on Flickr, Instagram, Twitter or other sites – tag them as #DPSmacro to help others find them. Linking back to this page might also help others know what you’re doing so that they can share in the fun.

    The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Macro appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    Weekly Photography Challenge – Macro

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=171487
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/iDmwbRQRVRg/

    The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Macro appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    This week’s photography challenge topic is MACRO! Go out and capture flowers, objects, insects etc. Just be sure they are really close up! They can be color, black and white, moody or bright. You get the picture! Have fun, and I look forward to seeing what you come up with! Check out some of the […]

    The post Weekly Photography Challenge – Macro appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    Fri, 17 May 2019 19:00:00 +0000

    The post TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories Under $100 [video] appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    Following on from last week’s video share from Mark DenneyWhich Landscape Photography Camera Should You Buy?“, I thought I’d also share his video on affordable landscape photography accessories.

    These are, of course, Mark’s opinions and not mine. I’d be interested to know your thoughts and if you have any to add to this list.

    In the video, Mark mentions these accessories in order of price, starting at number 13.

    TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories under $100

    13. Samsung 500GB SSD at $87.99

    While the Samsung 500GB SSD doesn’t have massive storage, it is perfect for travel because of its size and portability. It’s lightweight and durable and fits in your pocket.

    12. NRS Boundary Socks – $84.95

    NRS Boundary Socks are water socks and keep your feet warm and dry when standing in water. They have a seal around the top so that water cannot enter the top. These are also handy for getting better shots because you can get into the water and shoot from better angles.

    11. Vallerret Photography Gloves – $79.95

    The Vallerret Photography Gloves are perfect for photographers because the thumb and forefinger tips flip back to allow you to adjust your camera controls while still keeping your hands warm and dry. They also have a non-slip surface on the palm so that you can grip your camera confidently.

    10. Hoya Circular Polarizer – $53

    This Hoya Circular Polarizer is a great option if you are on a budget. The quality is high and the results are great. You may not always use it, but they are great to have.

    9. Black Diamond Headlamp – $38

    This Black Diamond Headlamp is great for when you are shooting sunrises and sunsets, blue hour, astrophotography and you have to hike in and out of places in the dark, and set up your camera in low light. Having it on your head leaves your hands free. The headlamp is also super-bright – with 3 levels of brightness.

    8. Tripod Spikes – $20-$96

    Tripod Spikes are great for digging your tripod into the surface to give your tripod extra stability.

    7. Pelican SD Card Case – $33.99

    The Pelican SD Card Case is tough, durable, and waterproof. It fits several cards safely. It protects one of the most important parts of your gear because that is where your photos are stored.

    6. Shimoda Small Accessory Case – $24.95

    The Shimoda small accessory case is ideal for storing your extra camera batteries, chargers cables, and anything related to power. It has a clear plastic side so that you can see exactly what is in the case too. The fact that it is bright blue means that you can find it easily in your suitcase or backpack.

    5. Small Moleskin Case – $19.95

    The Small Moleskin Case can be used for keeping tools, such as Allen keys, flathead screwdrivers, or backup tripod plates.

    4. Backpack Rain Cover – $5-$25

    Backpack Rain Covers are ideal for covering your backpack and also for covering your camera when it is set up ready to take shots near waterfalls or if it is rainy. Shower caps are also a good solution for covering your camera in the rain.

    3. Think Tank Red Whips (10) – $9.94

    The Think Tank Red Whips are amazing cable ties for keeping your cables organized.

    2. Giottos Rocket Blower – $8.00

    All photographers should have one of these. The Giottos Rocket Blower is perfect for blowing the dust off your lens and camera. It’s strong and

    1. Zeiss Microfibre Cloth – $7.90

    The Zeiss Microfibre Cloth is ideal for cleaning your lenses and filters.

     

    Do you have anything to add to this list? If so, please share in the comments below.

     

    You may also find the following helpful:

    The post TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories Under $100 [video] appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories Under $100 [video]

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=171789
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/U0GLLrtG9ik/

    The post TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories Under $100 [video] appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    Following on from last week’s video share from Mark Denney “Which Landscape Photography Camera Should You Buy?“, I thought I’d also share his video on affordable landscape photography accessories. ? These are, of course, Mark’s opinions and not mine. I’d be interested to know your thoughts and if you have any to add to this […]

    The post TOP 13 Landscape Photography Accessories Under $100 [video] appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Caz Nowaczyk.

    Fri, 17 May 2019 14:00:00 +0000

    The post Pros and Cons of Adobe Portfolio For Your Professional Gallery appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ian Johnson.

    I am going to tell you one of the worst parts about running a photography-based website, and you can tell me if you agree with me: maintaining your image galleries. Galleries are one of the greatest ways to show off your content to the world and to show everyone what you are all about. As you grow as a photographer, you need to continually update your public face and what you want to tell your followers. However, curating the content is so time-consuming that I often wonder if it’s worth it! I, (and surely you) would rather be out making more images and bringing visions to life, not spending more time in front of the computer. I have great news – you can use Adobe Lightroom’s workflow, coupled with Adobe Portfolio, to create beautiful and dynamic galleries in record-breaking time!

    This collection set in Adobe Lightroom syncs directly to my Adobe Portfolio. Any edits that I make to images in this collection sync automatically to the online gallery making it incredibly easy to keep up-to-date galleries on a website

    Adobe Portfolio? What is it?

    Adobe Portfolio is Adobe’s online website-for-dummies platform to display your images in stunning galleries. It links directly to Adobe Lightroom using collection sets. Updating the gallery is as easy as adding or removing an image from the collection! If you are already paying for their annual Adobe Cloud membership, you have access to Adobe Portfolio without paying another dime. This is a great option if you run your own low-budget website and are doing your best to keep your costs at a minimum.

    This is a look at my Adobe Portfolio website in design view. Adobe Portfolio offers easy website creation with dynamic, beautiful galleries connected directly to Lightroom.

    How to do it?

    To set up your Adobe Portfolio there’s really three main steps:

    1. Set up an Adobe Portfolio account,
    2. choose a template, and
    3. sync photos from your Adobe Lightroom collections to the website.

    Presto! In his article, Andrew Gibbon claims you can set up a full Adobe Portfolio website in 15 minutes. His step-by-step tutorial makes it easy! Since making a tutorial as thorough as Andrew’s would be simply re-writing the wheel, I’d like to instead turn to the pros and cons of Adobe Portfolio so you can determine if this service is right for you.

    Cons

    I always like to get the bad news before the good. So here’s a couple of cons for your consideration.

    1. Cannot sell imagery from it

    If selling your imagery through a savvy e-commerce solution is what you most desire, then Adobe Portfolio is not for you. Technically you can hyperlink your image to a sales page, but the likelihood of losing the shopper is high. There are multiple other web platforms such as Fine Art America, Smug Mug, Square Space, Weebly, and so many others that allow you to sell your imagery directly.

    2. Redirects traffic from your primary website

    If you run a website through another host, you will need to connect your websites. I outlink the galleries using a custom link in my WordPress site. If you feel you need to keep people on your primary website to sell them something or deliver a message, then you may choose to avoid Adobe Portfolio and look for integrated gallery options. I will say though; Adobe Portfolio gives you lots of options on their templates to re-direct people where you want them to go (such as sales) after they view your gallery.

    I outlink to my Adobe Portfolio galleries which directs traffic away from my primary website. If you need to keep traffic on your primary website, then Adobe Portfolio may not be for you.

    3. Templates are pretty, but not highly customizable

    The templates within Adobe Portfolio do not give you access to CSS or other mechanisms to customize them. Although you can change the color of the theme, your options are very limited here.

    Pros

    The way I want to use Adobe Portfolio, the pros outweigh the cons. The pros below are listed in importance (most important to least) for my own workflow and website needs.

    1. Show image edits in Lightroom instantly

    How many times do you re-edit an image? There are so many reasons why you continue to tweak an image. In most website galleries, a new image edit would require taking down the old edit and uploading the new. Not so with Adobe Portfolio. Any edits sync (color, crop, clarity, any of them!) to your Adobe Portfolio and can be updated on your website with just a few clicks. In my eyes, this is the #1 reason that Adobe Portfolio shines for my needs.

    In each of these thumbnails, you can see a double arrow in the upper right-hand corner. That means all changes are automatically synced to my gallery online!

    2. “Free” if you already pay for an Adobe Creative Cloud membership

    There’s a good chance that you do not want to pay for more services than you already do. Camera gear, website fees, and everything else add up! As long as you already pay the annual membership for Adobe Creative Cloud, Adobe Portfolio is included.

    3. Automatically resizes images

    Adobe Portfolio’s galleries are very beautiful. Even though a RAW file is being synced to the Adobe Cloud, they automatically reduce the resolution of the image to optimize load time and viewing. This also makes it is less useful to a copyright thief. Having this built-in functionality removes any need to research optimal DPI, web color space, and pixel widths you would need to do if exporting your images for the web.

    4. Lots of templates that easily outlink to your other content

    I mentioned in the cons that you have to outlink to your Adobe Portfolio. However, all of the Adobe Portfolio templates provide lots of links back to your other work.

    This landing screen of my Adobe Portfolio has five links where viewers can click to redirect back to my website and two links to my social media websites. In my opinion, if you can hook them with your beautiful galleries it is likely they will follow your links.

    5. You can create as many collections as you want

    In Adobe Portfolio, collections act as a page on your website. There are no limits to the number of pages you can create. This gives you a huge amount of flexibility because you can create very specific collections (say for an individual wedding or a species of animal) and have personalized galleries for each one.

    6. No coding necessary

    There is absolutely zero coding needed to set up an Adobe Portfolio website. If you want to have heavy customization privileges over your website, this isn’t for you. However, I found most of the templates to have characteristics that I liked, and I’m not looking for a lot of control over this website. That’s in stark contrast to my WordPress site where I like to have CSS control for each element in a theme.

    The Bottom Line

    The bottom line is there are SO many ways to display your images on a website – many ways to “skin that cat” if you will – that finding the best solution for you can be challenging. I think many users will find the ease of creation and low cost of Adobe Portfolio to be very appealing, but it may not be desirable for high-level web users.

    I’m all ears and happy to discuss Adobe Portfolio further, and my experience or yours. Please provide your constructive thoughts, and I’ll be sure to respond!

    The post Pros and Cons of Adobe Portfolio For Your Professional Gallery appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ian Johnson.

    Pros and Cons of Adobe Portfolio For Your Professional Gallery

    https://digital-photography-school.com/?p=168491
    http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DigitalPhotographySchool/~3/_myfXQjyMaE/

    The post Pros and Cons of Adobe Portfolio For Your Professional Gallery appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ian Johnson.

    I am going to tell you one of the worst parts about running a photography-based website, and you can tell me if you agree with me: maintaining your image galleries. Galleries are one of the greatest ways to show off your content to the world and to show everyone what you are all about. As […]

    The post Pros and Cons of Adobe Portfolio For Your Professional Gallery appeared first on Digital Photography School. It was authored by Ian Johnson.

    Thu, 16 May 2019 19:00:05 +0000